Landmark: United States Logo

National Historic Landmarks

Places important in American History.

'Iolani-Palace

'Iolani Palace

Honolulu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, 96813
The 'Iolani Palace was the royal residence of the rulers of the Kingdom of Hawaii from 1845 to 1893. After the monarchy was overthrown in 1893, the building was used as the capitol building until 1969.

40-Wall-Street-(The-Trump-Building)

40 Wall Street (The Trump Building)

New York, New York, 10005
40 Wall Street is a 70-story skyscraper originally known as The Bank of the Manhattan Company building. It was completed in 1930 after only 11 months of construction, and was the tallest building in the world for less than 2 months.

Abo-Pueblo-Ruins

Abo Pueblo Ruins

Abo, Torrance County, New Mexico, 87036
Abo is a pueblo ruin in New Mexico that is preserved in the Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument. There is a trail through the mission ruins, and a 0.5 mile (0.8 km) trail around the unexcavated pueblo ruins.

Abraham-Lincoln-Birthplace-National-Historic-Site

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site

Hodgenville, LaRue County, Kentucky, 42748
Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park preserves two separate farm sites in LaRue County, where Abraham Lincoln was born and lived until the age of seven.

Abraham-Lincoln-Tomb

Abraham Lincoln Tomb

Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, 62702
This Illinois State Historic Site is the final resting place of Abraham Lincoln, his wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, and three of their four sons. The exterior includes a terrace and an obelisk, while the interior contains a rotunda and the burial room.

Academy-of-Music

Academy of Music

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19102
Opened in 1857, the building is the oldest grand opera house in America used for its original purpose. It is the home of the Pennsylvania Ballet and the Philadelphia Opera Company.

Acoma-Pueblo

Acoma Pueblo

Cibola County, New Mexico
Also known as "Sky City", Acoma Pueblo is a American Indian site built on top of a 367-foot (112 m) sandstone mesa. It is regarded as the oldest continuously inhabited community in the United States.

Adams-National-Historical-Park

Adams National Historical Park

Quincy, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, 02169
This National Historical Park contains the home of presidents John and John Quincy Adams. It features the house, the surrounding farmland and several other buildings, including the Stone Library.

Adler-Planetarium-and-Astronomy-Museum

Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum

Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, 60605
The Adler opened in 1930 and was the first planetarium in the Western Hemisphere. Donated to the city of Chicago by Max Adler, the planetarium was an attraction at the great Chicago exposition of 1933-34.

Alaska-Native-Brotherhood-Hall-(Sitka-Camp-No.-1)

Alaska Native Brotherhood Hall (Sitka Camp No. 1)

Sitka, Alaska
The building is significant for being the original chapter of the Alaska Native Brotherhood, an organization representing native rights in Alaska.

Allen-County-Courthouse

Allen County Courthouse

Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, 46802
The Allen County Courthouse is in the heart of Fort Wayne, Indiana, the county seat of Allen County. Built between 1897 and 1902, it is a nationally significant example of Beaux-Arts architecture.

Amana-Colonies

Amana Colonies

Amana, Iowa County, Iowa, 52203
The Amana Colonies are a group of settlements of German Pietists. They lived a communal life until the mid 1930s. Today, Amana is a major tourist attraction known mainly for its restaurants and craft shops.

American-Civil-War-Museum

American Civil War Museum

Richmond, Virginia
The American Civil War Museum is a multi-site museum in the Greater Richmond Region of central Virginia, dedicated to the history of the American Civil War.

American-Precision-Museum

American Precision Museum

West Windsor, Windsor County, Vermont, 05089
The American Precision Museum is located in the renovated 1846 Robbins & Lawrence factory on South Main Street in Windsor, Vermont. The museum has the largest collection of historically significant machine tools in the United States.

Andrews-United-Methodist-Church-and-International-Mother's-Day-Shrine

Andrews United Methodist Church and International Mother's Day Shrine

Grafton, Taylor County, West Virginia, 26354
The first Mother's Day was celebrated here on May 10, 1908 inspired by Ann Jarvis, who had been active in Mother's Day campaigns for peace and worker's safety and health since end of American Civil War.

Ashland

Ashland

Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky, 40502
Ashland is the name of the plantation of the 19th-century Kentucky statesman Henry Clay. Clay and his family resided at Ashland from about 1806 until his death in 1852.

Balboa-Park

Balboa Park

San Diego, California, 92104
Balboa Park is a 1,200-acre (490 ha) urban cultural park in San Diego, California. In addition to open space areas, natural vegetation zones, green belts, gardens, and walking paths, it contains museums, several theaters, and the San Diego Zoo.

Ball's-Bluff-Battlefield-and-National-Cemetery

Ball's Bluff Battlefield and National Cemetery

Waterford, Loudoun County, Virginia
The Battle of Ball's Bluff, on October 21, 1861, was a small but embarrassing defeat for the Union early in the American Civil War. The land for a cemetery was donated in 1865. It is the smallest national cemetery in the United States.

Barrackville-Covered-Bridge

Barrackville Covered Bridge

Barrackville, Marion County, West Virginia, 26452
Built in 1853 by Eli and Lemuel Chenoweth, well-known bridge builders of the time, the 148 feet span is now closed to motor traffic. It was restored in 1999.

Barton-Academy

Barton Academy

Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, 36602
Barton Academy was the first public school in the state of Alabama. The building was named for Willoughby Barton, an Alabama state legislator from Mobile who introduced an act that created the Board of School Commissioners of Mobile County

Barton-Hall-(Cunningham-Plantation)

Barton Hall (Cunningham Plantation)

Colbert County, Alabama
Built for Armstead Barton in the 1840s, this antebellum, privately-owned home is an unusually sophisticated Greek Revival style plantation house with a small Doric entrance and limestone-paved rear courtyard.

Bathhouse-Row

Bathhouse Row

Hot Springs, Garland County, Arkansas, 71901
Bathhouse Row is a collection of bathhouses which were included in 1832 when the Federal Government took over the land to preserve 47 natural hot springs and their area of origin on the lower slopes of Hot Springs Mountain.

Battle-Monument

Battle Monument

Baltimore, Maryland
The monument commemorates the Battle of Baltimore fought during the War of 1812. Designed by Maximilian Godfrey and built in 1815-25, the monument is 39 feet tall and is topped by a statue by Antonio Capellano of a female figure representing Baltimore.

Bear-River-Massacre-Monument

Bear River Massacre Monument

Franklin County, Idaho
The Bear River Massacre site was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1990. More than 220 Shoshone Indians were killed by United States forces in January, 1863.

Beauvoir

Beauvoir

Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi, 39531
The Beauvoir estate is notable as the historic post-war home (1876-1889) of the former President of the Confederate States of America, Jefferson Davis. The name "Beauvoir" means "beautiful to view".

Bering-Expedition-Landing-Site

Bering Expedition Landing Site

Alaska
According to the U.S. National Park Service, this is where the first attempts at contact between Europeans and Alaskan natives were made by naturalist Georg W. Steller, surgeon aboard Vitus Bering's St. Peter.

Beth-Sholom-Synagogue

Beth Sholom Synagogue

Elkins Park, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania
The only synagogue ever designed by famed architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, Beth Sholom is Hebrew for House of Peace. Its steeply inclined walls of translucent wire glass and plastic are meant to represent both a mountain and a tent.

Bethel-Baptist-Church,-Parsonage,-and-Guardhouse

Bethel Baptist Church, Parsonage, and Guardhouse

Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 35207
The Bethel Baptist Church, Parsonage, and Guardhouse are associated with the first organized movement of the modern civil rights movement. The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights was headquartered here from 1956-1961.

Bizzell-Library

Bizzell Library

Norman, Oklahoma
It is an elaborate Collegiate Gothic or Cherokee Gothic building, designed by the architecture firm Layton Hicks & Forsyth and constructed in 1928 during the administration of OU's fifth president, William Bennett Bizzell.

Boston-Avenue-United-Methodist-Church

Boston Avenue United Methodist Church

Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, 74119
The Boston Avenue United Methodist Church, located in downtown Tulsa, Oklahoma, and completed in 1929, is considered to be one of the finest examples of ecclesiastical Art Deco architecture in the United States.

Bottle-Creek-Indian-Mounds

Bottle Creek Indian Mounds

Baldwin County, Alabama
This is an archaeological site once occupied by a Mississippian culture between AD 1250 and 1550. It includes 18 earthen mounds, the tallest being roughly 45 feet high.

Brown-Chapel-A.M.E.-Church

Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church

Selma, Dallas County, Alabama, 36703
This church was a starting point for the Selma to Montgomery marches in 1965 and played a major role in the events that led to the adoption of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Buffalo-Trace-Distillery

Buffalo Trace Distillery

Frankfort, Franklin County, Kentucky, 40601
Buffalo Trace Distillery is a distillery in Frankfort, Kentucky, owned by the Sazerac Company. Its namesake bourbon brand, Buffalo Trace Kentucky Straight Bourbon whiskey, was introduced in August 1999.

Bushy-Run-Battlefield-State-Park

Bushy Run Battlefield State Park

Penn Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania
The Battle of Bushy Run was a major victory for the British during Pontiac's Rebellion and enabled them to secure their control of the Ohio River Valley and what was to become the Northwest Territory.

Cades-Cove

Cades Cove

Tennessee
Cades Cove is an isolated valley located in the Tennessee section of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The valley was home to numerous settlers before the formation of the national park.

Canal-Street

Canal Street

New Orleans, Louisiana
Canal Street is a major thoroughfare in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. It is the dividing line between the older French and Spanish Colonial era city and the newer Central Business District.

Cape-Krusenstern-National-Monument

Cape Krusenstern National Monument

Alaska
Cape Krusenstern National Monument stretches 70 miles along the Chukchi Sea shoreline. It is made up mainly of a coastal plain, containing large lagoons and rolling hills of limestone. Beach ridges provide evidence of 5000 years of human activity.

Chase-County-Kansas-Courthouse

Chase County Kansas Courthouse

Cottonwood Falls, Chase County, Kansas
The courthouse was completed in 1873, making it the oldest courthouse still in use west of the Mississippi River. It is also the state's finest remaining example of Second Empire architecture.

Chase–Lloyd-House

Chase–Lloyd House

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland
The Chase–Lloyd House is a historic house in Annapolis, Maryland. Built in 1769-1774, it is one of the first brick three-story Georgian mansions to be built in the Thirteen Colonies, and is one of the finest examples of the style.

Cherokee-National-Capitol

Cherokee National Capitol

Tahlequah, Cherokee County, Oklahoma, 74464
The Cherokee National Capitol served as the headquarters for Cherokee government from the time of its completion until 1907 when Oklahoma became a State. The structure is fairly well preserved and is a late example of the Italianate style.

Christ-Church

Christ Church

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Constructed between 1727 and 1744, Christ Church is the birthplace of the American Episcopal Church in the United States. The congregation included 15 signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Church-of-the-Nativity-Episcopal

Church of the Nativity Episcopal

Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama, 35801
Episcopal Church of the Nativity is a church in Huntsville, Alabama. It was built in the Gothic Revival style in 1859.

Circus-World-Museum

Circus World Museum

Baraboo, Sauk County, Wisconsin, 53913
The Circus World Museum is a large museum complex devoted to circus-related history. The museum features circus artifacts and exhibits and hosts daily live circus performances throughout the summer.

City-of-Rocks-National-Reserve

City of Rocks National Reserve

Malta, Cassia County, Idaho, 83342
In 1964, The City of Rocks and a much larger area around it was designated a National Historic Landmark. It is widely known for its excellent rock climbing and rock formations.

Columbus-Park

Columbus Park

Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, 60644
The 135-acre Columbus Park is considered the masterpiece of nationally renowned landscape architect, Jens Jensen, who is recognized as creator of Prairie style landscape design.

Confederate-State-Capitol-Building

Confederate State Capitol Building

Washington, Hempstead County, Arkansas
The Confederate State Capitol building in Washington, Arkansas was the capital of the Confederate state government of Arkansas, during 1863 - 1865, after Little Rock, Arkansas fell to Union forces in the American Civil War.

Connecticut-State-Capitol

Connecticut State Capitol

Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, 06106
The Connecticut State Capitol was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1971.

Coolidge-Homestead

Coolidge Homestead

Plymouth Notch, Windsor County, Vermont, 05056
The Coolidge Homestead was the childhood home of the thirtieth President of the United States, Calvin Coolidge. He lived there from 1876 to 1887. The homestead is part of the Calvin Coolidge State Historical Site.

Crescent-Park-Looff-Carousel

Crescent Park Looff Carousel

Riverside, Rhode Island
The hand-carved carousel was built in 1895 by Charles I. D. Looff and installed at Crescent Park Amusement Park in Riverside, Rhode Island. The ride's fifty-foot platform contains sixty-one horses, one camel, two single coaches, and two double chariots.

Dana–Thomas-House

Dana–Thomas House

Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, 62703
The Dana–Thomas House is a home in Prairie School style designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Built 1902–04 for patron Susan Lawrence Dana, it is in Springfield, Illinois.

Dubuque-County-Jail

Dubuque County Jail

Dubuque, Dubuque County, Iowa, 52001
Completed in 1858, this massive Egyptian Revival style stone building was designed by the same architect who also did the Old Illinois State Capitol. The Dubuque County Historical Society now owns the building and operates it as a local history museum.

El-Centro-Espanol-of-West-Tampa

El Centro Espanol of West Tampa

Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida, 33605
El Centro Espanol was a organization of cigar workers in Ybor City and West Tampa. Built in 1912, members could use the building as a sort of club house or for amenities such as a gym, casino (game room), cafe, etc.

Elfreth's-Alley

Elfreth's Alley

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
The houses in this small street have been privately owned and lived in since the early 1700's, making Elfreth's Alley the oldest continuously inhabited residential street in the country.

Ellis-Island

Ellis Island

New York, New York
Between 1892 and 1954, over 12 million European immigrants passed through the processing station at Ellis Island. Today, the island is home to a museum dedicated to immigration and the idea of seeking a new and better life in America.

Episcopal-Church-of-the-Nativity

Episcopal Church of the Nativity

Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama, 35801
This church was built in the Gothic Revival style in 1859. It is noted as one of the most pristine examples of Ecclesiological Gothic architecture in the South. It is also one of the least-altered structures by architect Frank Wills.

F.-Scott-Fitzgerald-House-aka-Summit-Terrace

F. Scott Fitzgerald House aka Summit Terrace

St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota, 55102
The design of the rowhouse was called the "New York Style", although the general flavor is Romanesque Revival. In July and August of 1919, this was where Fitzgerald rewrote the manuscript that became his first novel, This Side of Paradise.

First-Bank-of-the-United-States

First Bank of the United States

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Chartered in 1791, the First Bank of the United States was erected in the neo-classical style to echo the democracy of Ancient Greece. The bank building was restored for the Bicentennial in 1976.

First-Baptist-Church-in-America

First Baptist Church in America

Providence, Rhode Island, 02803
The First Baptist Church in America is the First Baptist Church of Providence, Rhode Island, also known as the First Baptist Meetinghouse.

Flatiron-Building

Flatiron Building

New York, New York, 10010
The Flatiron Building was designed by Chicago's Daniel Burnham in the Beaux-Arts style. The 22-story building, with a height of 285 ft (87 meters), is one of the oldest surviving skyscrapers in Manhattan.

Fonthill

Fonthill

Doylestown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, Fonthill was Built between 1908 and 1912. It is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 42 rooms, 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms.

Fort-Morgan

Fort Morgan

Gasque, Baldwin County, Alabama
The post was named in honor of Revolutionary War hero Daniel Morgan. Construction was completed in 1834 and it was first garrisoned in March of that year. In 2007, it was listed as "one of the nation's 10 most endangered battle sites."

Fort-Sumter

Fort Sumter

Charleston, South Carolina
The fort was named after General Thomas Sumter, a hero of the American Revolution. On April 12, 1861, at 4:30 a.m., Confederate batteries opened fire on the fort, which started the American Civil War.

Fort-Toulouse-Fort-Jackson

Fort Toulouse Fort Jackson

Elmore County, Alabama
The fort was first established in 1717 by the French to counter the growing influence of the British colonies of Georgia and Carolina. It was named for Louis-Alexandre de Bourbon, comte de Toulouse. Fort Jackson was later built on the site.

Fort-Western

Fort Western

Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine, 04330
Fort Western is a former British colonial outpost at the head of navigation on the Kennebec River at modern Augusta, Maine. It was built in 1754 during the French and Indian War.

Frank-M.-Johnson-Jr.-Federal-Building-and-United-States-Courthouse

Frank M. Johnson Jr. Federal Building and United States Courthouse

Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama
The Frank M. Johnson Jr. Federal Building and United States Courthouse is a United States federal building in Montgomery, Alabama, completed in 1933 and primarily used as a courthouse of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Alabama.

Franklin-Court

Franklin Court

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
This is where Benjamin Franklin lived and worked in Philadelphia. The court contains recreations of storefronts and apartments owned and run by Franklin, plus a "ghost house," a steel representation of his house. There is also an underground museum.

French-Quarter

French Quarter

New Orleans, Louisiana
The French Quarter is the oldest and most famous neighborhood in New Orleans, Louisiana. Many of the buildings date from before New Orleans became part of the United States. New Orlean's Mardi Gras celebration is centered here.

Gaineswood

Gaineswood

Demopolis, Marengo County, Alabama, 36732
Gaineswood is one of the most significant remaining examples of Greek Revival architecture in Alabama. The house and grounds are currently operated by the Alabama Historical Commission as a historic house museum.

Golden-Spike-National-Historic-Site

Golden Spike National Historic Site

Promontory Summit, Utah
The Transcontinental Railroad was completed here on May 10, 1869.

Government-Street-Presbyterian-Church

Government Street Presbyterian Church

Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, 36602
Government Street Presbyterian Church is one of the oldest Greek Revival church buildings in the United States. The interior is notable because the original Greek Revival design is fully intact with very little alteration.

Graceland

Graceland

Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee, 38116
Graceland is a mansion on a 13.8-acre (5.6 ha) estate in Memphis, Tennessee that was home to Elvis Presley. It has become one of the most-visited private homes in America with over 650,000 visitors a year, only behind the White House.

Grenville-M.-Dodge-House

Grenville M. Dodge House

Council Bluffs, Pottawattamie County, Iowa, 51503
From 1869 until his death, this was the residence of Grenville M. Dodge, who as Chief Engineer supervised the completion in 1869 of the Union Pacific Railroad. His three story, 14 room Victorian mansion was considered one of the finest residences in Iowa

Grumblethorpe

Grumblethorpe

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19144
In September 1777, during the Battle of Germantown, the British General James Agnew occupied the house as his headquarters. He was wounded and died in the front parlor, where his blood stains can still be seen on the floor.

Hammond–Harwood-House

Hammond–Harwood House

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, 21401
The Hammond–Harwood House is a historic house museum in Annapolis, Maryland, USA. Built in 1774, is one of the premier colonial houses remaining in America from the British colonial period (1607–1776).

Harold-C.-Bradley-House

Harold C. Bradley House

Madison, Dane County, Wisconsin, 53726
Harold C. Bradley House, also known as Mrs. Josephine Crane Bradley Residence, is a Prairie School home designed by Louis H. Sullivan and George Grant Elmslie.

Harriet-Beecher-Stowe-House

Harriet Beecher Stowe House

Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, 06105
The Harriet Beecher Stowe House is a historic house museum and National Historic Landmark that was once the home of Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin.

Hearst-Castle

Hearst Castle

San Simeon, California, 93452
Hearst Castle was designed by architect Julia Morgan, between 1919 and 1947, as a residence for newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, who died in 1951.

Henry-D.-Clayton-House

Henry D. Clayton House

Barbour County, Alabama, 36016
This was the birthplace and home of Henry De Lamar Clayton, Jr., a legislator and judge. While serving in the U.S. Congress, he sponsored the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914. The plantation house was built by his father Henry DeLamar Clayton, a Confederat

Holy-Hill-National-Shrine-of-Mary,-Help-of-Christians

Holy Hill National Shrine of Mary, Help of Christians

Erin, Wisconsin, 53033
Holy Hill National Shrine of Mary, Help of Christians is a Roman Catholic shrine dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary. The centerpiece of the shrine is a minor basilica. The shrine has approximately 300,000 visitors per year.

Hoover-Dam

Hoover Dam

Mohave County, Arizona
Hoover Dam, once known as Boulder Dam, is a concrete arch-gravity dam in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River, on the border between the U.S. states of Arizona and Nevada. It was constructed between 1931 and 1936.

Hoover-Dam-(Boulder-Dam)

Hoover Dam (Boulder Dam)

Nevada
Hoover Dam is a concrete gravity-arch dam on the border between the U.S. states of Arizona and Nevada.

Huddleston-Farmhouse-Inn-Museum

Huddleston Farmhouse Inn Museum

Mount Auburn, Indiana
The Huddleston Farmhouse served as a rest stop for travelers using the National Road (Cumberland Road), one of the earliest highways built in America. The Quaker family of 11 who lived in the house provided stables, food and lodging.

Illinois-State-Capitol

Illinois State Capitol

Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, 62701
The Illinois capitol is the tallest non-skyscraper capitol, even exceeding the height of the United States Capitol in Washington, DC. The building itself is shaped like a Latin cross aligned to the major points of the compass.

Independence-Hall

Independence Hall

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
Originally the home of the Pennsylvania Assembly and Supreme Court during the Colonial Era, the building was called the Pennsylvania State House. The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution were adopted and signed here.

Ivy-Green

Ivy Green

Tuscumbia, Colbert County, Alabama, 35674
Ivy Green is the name for the childhood home of Helen Keller. The house was built in 1820 and is a simple white clapboard house. The actual well pump where Helen Keller first communicated with Anne Sullivan is located at Ivy Green.

Jabez-Lamar-Monroe-Curry-Home

Jabez Lamar Monroe Curry Home

Talladega County, Alabama
Curry was a lawyer, politician, and educator who encouraged the expansion and improvement of the public school system and the establishment of training schools for teachers throughout the south.

John-Dickinson-House

John Dickinson House

Dover, Kent County, Delaware, 19901
The John Dickinson House, generally known as Poplar Hall, is located on the John Dickinson Plantation in Dover, a property owned by the State of Delaware and open to the public as a museum by the Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs.

John-Harris---Simon-Cameron-House

John Harris - Simon Cameron House

Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, 17104
The Simon Cameron House is a historic house museum in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Built in 1766 and frequently extended and altered, it is one of Harrisburg's oldest buildings.

John-Paul-Jones-House

John Paul Jones House

Portsmouth, New Hampshire
The John Paul Jones House is most significant as the only known surviving structure in the United States associated with American Revolutionary War naval hero John Paul Jones, who was resident here in 1781-82 when it was operated as a boarding house.

Kenworthy-Hall-a.k.a.-Carlisle-Martin-House

Kenworthy Hall a.k.a. Carlisle-Martin House

Perry County, Alabama
It is the only surviving residential example of Richard Upjohn's Italian villa style that was especially designed to suit the Southern climate and the plantation lifestyle. The building was designed and constructed for Edward Kenworthy Carlisle.

Leland-Stanford-Mansion-State-Historic-Park

Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park

Sacramento, California, 95814
The Leland Stanford Mansion is a historic mansion and California State Park in Sacramento, California, which serves as the official reception center for the Californian government and as one of the official workplaces of the Governor of California.

Levi-Coffin-House

Levi Coffin House

Fountain City, Wayne County, Indiana, 47341
The Levi Coffin House is a National Historic Landmark located in present-day Fountain City, Indiana. The two-story, eight room, brick house was constructed in 1839 in the Federal style and served as a station on the Underground Railroad.

Liberty-Hall

Liberty Hall

Frankfort, Franklin County, Kentucky, 40601
Liberty Hall is a historic house museum in Frankfort, Kentucky. Built 1796-1800 by American statesman John Brown, it is known for its association with Brown and its fine Federal-style architecture.

Liberty-Memorial

Liberty Memorial

Kansas City, Missouri
When the Liberty Memorial opened on November 11, 1926 , President Calvin Coolidge delivered the dedication speech. The memorial is home to the National World War I Museum, which opened on December 2, 2006.

Lincoln-Home-National-Historic-Site

Lincoln Home National Historic Site

Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, 62701
Lincoln Home National Historic Site preserves the Springfield, Illinois home and related historic district where Abraham Lincoln lived from 1844 to 1861, before becoming the 16th President of the United States.

Little-Rock-Central-High-School

Little Rock Central High School

Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas
In 1957, nine African-American students, known as the Little Rock Nine, were denied entrance to the school in defiance of the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court ruling ordering integration of public schools.

Louisiana-State-Capitol

Louisiana State Capitol

Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge County, Louisiana, 70802
At 450 feet (137 meters) tall, with 34 stories, it is the tallest capitol building in the United States, the tallest building in Baton Rouge, and the seventh-tallest building in Louisiana.

Mark-Twain-House

Mark Twain House

Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, 06105
In 1962, the Mark Twain House was declared a National Historic Landmark. Since 1974, it has had a multi-million dollar renovation and an expansion dedicated to showcasing Twain's life and work.

Market-Hall

Market Hall

Charleston, Charleston County, South Carolina, 29401
Market Hall is a Greek Revival-style building, and the high base and frontal portico were inspired by Greek and Roman temples such as the Temple of Portunus and Temple of Athena Nike.

Marshall-Space-Flight-Center-(MSFC)

Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama, 35801
The original home of NASA, it was here that President Dwight D. Eisenhower announced the formation of the organization on July 1, 1960. The Space Flight Center is named in honor of General George C. Marshall.

Maryland-State-House

Maryland State House

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, 21401
The Maryland State House is the oldest state capitol in continuous legislative use, dating to 1772. It houses the Maryland General Assembly. The capitol has the distinction of being topped by the largest wooden dome built without nails in the nation.

Massachusetts-State-House

Massachusetts State House

Boston, Massachusetts, 02133
The building is situated on 6.7 acres (27,000 m2) of land on top of Beacon Hill in Boston. The dome is topped with a pine cone, symbolizing both the importance of Boston's lumber industry in the early colonial days.

Medgar-and-Myrlie-Evers-Home-National-Monument

Medgar and Myrlie Evers Home National Monument

Jackson, Hinds County, Mississippi
The Medgar and Myrlie Evers Home National Monument is a historic house museum in Jackson, Mississippi. Built in 1956, it was the home of African-American civil rights activist Medgar Evers (1925-1963) at the time of his assassination.

Michigan-State-Capitol

Michigan State Capitol

Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan, 48933
The Michigan State Capitol is 267 feet (81.3 m) from the ground to the tip of finial/spire above the dome. The building is 420 feet (130 m) and two inches (128 m) long and 273 feet (83 m) and 11 inches (83.4 m) wide.

Mill-City-Museum

Mill City Museum

Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, 55401
Mill City Museum opened in 2003, built in the ruins of the Washburn "A" Mill. The museum focuses on the founding and growth of Minneapolis, especially flour milling and the other industries that used water power from Saint Anthony Falls.

Mississippi-Governor's-Mansion

Mississippi Governor's Mansion

Jackson, Hinds County, Mississippi
The Mississippi Governor's Mansion is the official residence of the Governor of Mississippi. It is located in downtown Jackson, Mississippi, south of the Mississippi State Capitol, at the south end of Smith Park.

Missouri-Botanical-Garden-(Shaw's-Garden)

Missouri Botanical Garden (Shaw's Garden)

St. Louis, Missouri, 63110
The Missouri Botanical Garden is a botanical garden located at 4344 Shaw Boulevard in St. Louis, Missouri. It is also known informally as Shaw's Garden for founder and philanthropist Henry Shaw.

Monmouth-Battlefield-State-Park

Monmouth Battlefield State Park

Freehold, Monmouth County, New Jersey
Monmouth Battlefield State Park is a 1,818-acre (7.36 km2) New Jersey state park located on the border of Manalapan and Freehold Township.

Moundville-Archaeological-Site

Moundville Archaeological Site

Moundville, Hale County, Alabama, 35474
Extensive archaeological investigation has shown that this site was the political and ceremonial center of a regionally organized Mississippian culture between the 11th and 14th centuries.

National-Memorial-Arch

National Memorial Arch

Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
The Arch was erected in 1910 by an act of the 61st Congress. Designed by University of Pennsylvania professor Paul Philippe Cret, the Arch is built in a style similar to the Arch of Titus in Rome.

Nebraska-State-Capitol

Nebraska State Capitol

Lincoln, Lancaster County, Nebraska, 68508
The Indiana limestone structure draws on both Classical and Gothic architectural traditions, but represents major innovations in state capitol design. The structure is nicknamed "The Tower of the Plains."

North-Carolina-Capital-Building

North Carolina Capital Building

Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina, 27601
The North Carolina State Capitol is the former seat of the legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. Currently housing the offices of the Governor of North Carolina.

North-Conway-Railroad-Station

North Conway Railroad Station

North Conway, Carroll County, New Hampshire, 03860
This station marked the northern terminus of the Conway Branch of the Portsmouth, Great Falls and Conway Railroad. The Conway Scenic Railroad restored the building in 1974. Today, a gift shop occupies the old waiting room.

Oak-Alley-Plantation

Oak Alley Plantation

Vacherie, St. James County, Louisiana, 70090
Oak Alley Plantation is a historic plantation located on the west bank of the Mississippi River, in the community of Vacherie, St. James Parish, Louisiana.

Oklahoma-State-Capitol

Oklahoma State Capitol

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, 73105
The Oklahoma State Capitol is the house of government of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It is the building that houses the Oklahoma Legislature and executive branch offices.

Old-Army-Navy-Hospital

Old Army Navy Hospital

Hot Springs, Garland County, Arkansas, 71901
Now home to Arkansas' Department of Rehabilitation, the Army-Navy Hospital opened in November of 1933. Several hospitals had been built along Bathhouse Row to take advantage of the hot springs.

Old-Barracks-Museum

Old Barracks Museum

Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, 08608
The Old Barracks Museum is a historic building in Trenton, New Jersey. It is the only remaining colonial barracks in the state and is now used as a history museum.

Old-Capitol-Museum

Old Capitol Museum

Jackson, Mississippi, 39201
The Old Mississippi State Capitol, also known as Old Capitol Museum or Old State Capitol, served as the Mississippi statehouse from 1839 until 1903. The building now serves as a museum.

Old-City-Hall-Southern-Market-(Museum-of-Mobile)

Old City Hall Southern Market (Museum of Mobile)

Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, 36602
This is a historic complex of adjoining buildings that currently houses the Museum of Mobile. The complex was built from 1855 to 1857 to serve as a city hall and as a marketplace.

Old-Louisiana-State-Capitol

Old Louisiana State Capitol

Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge County, Louisiana
The Old Louisiana State Capitol, also known as the State House, housed the Louisiana State Legislature from the mid-19th century until the current capitol tower building was constructed in 1929-32.

Old-North-Church

Old North Church

Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 02113
Old North Church (officially, Christ Church in the City of Boston) is the location from which the famous "One if by land, and two if by sea" signal is said to have been sent. This phrase is related to Paul Revere's midnight ride, of April 18, 1775.

Old-Ship-Church

Old Ship Church

Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts
The Old Ship Church is a Puritan church built in 1681 in Hingham, Massachusetts. It is the only surviving 17th-century Puritan meetinghouse in America. It occupies the oldest church building in continuous ecclesiastical use in the United States.

Old-State-Capitol

Old State Capitol

Frankfort, Franklin County, Kentucky, 40601
The Old State Capitol, also known as Old Statehouse, was the third capitol of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The Kentucky legislature voted for its construction in 1827.

Old-State-Capitol-State-Historic-Site

Old State Capitol State Historic Site

Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois, 62701
The Old State Capitol State Historic Site, in Springfield, Illinois, is the fifth capitol building built for the U.S. state of Illinois. It was built in the Greek Revival style in 1837–1840, and served as the state house from 1840 to 1876.

Old-State-House

Old State House

Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut, 06103
Completed in 1796, the building was the state capitol until 1878. Exhibits focus on the history of Hartford and important events in Connecticut history.. The third floor of the building houses the Museum of Natural and Other Curiosities.

Old-State-House-

Old State House

Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts
The Old State House is a historic building in Boston, Massachusetts. Built in 1713, it was the seat of the Massachusetts General Court until 1798. It is one of the oldest public buildings in the United States.

Paca-House-and-Garden

Paca House and Garden

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland
The William Paca House (at one time known as Carvel Hall) is an 18th-century Georgian mansion in Annapolis, Maryland. William Paca was a signatory of the Declaration of Independence and a three-term Governor of Maryland.

Palace-of-the-Governors

Palace of the Governors

Santa Fe, New Mexico, 87501
The Palace of the Governors is the oldest continuously occupied public building in the United States. When New Mexico was annexed as a U.S. territory, the Palace the first territorial capitol.

Paris-Gibson-Square-Museum-of-Art

Paris Gibson Square Museum of Art

Great Falls, Cascade County, Montana
Paris Gibson Square Museum of Art is an art museum. The building was constructed in 1896 to house the city's first high school. It is one of six museums in the city.

Paul-Revere-House

Paul Revere House

Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, 02113
The Paul Revere House (1680) was the colonial home of American patriot Paul Revere during the time of the American Revolution. A National Historic Landmark, it is now operated as a nonprofit museum by the Paul Revere Memorial Association.

Pennsylvania-Academy-of-Fine-Arts

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts was founded in 1805 by painter and scientist Charles Willson Peale, sculptor William Rush, and other artists and business leaders. It is the oldest art museum and school in the nation.

Pennsylvania-State-Capitol

Pennsylvania State Capitol

Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, 17120
The Pennsylvania State Capitol is the seat of government for the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. Located in downtown Harrisburg, it was completed in 1906 in a Beaux-Arts style with decorative Renaissance themes throughout.

Physick-House

Physick House

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
The building was once the home of Philip Syng Physick, who is known as the father of American surgery. From his home medical office, he treated many well-known patients including Dolly Madison, President Andrew Jackson and Chief Justice John Marshall.

Pictograph-Cave

Pictograph Cave

Billings, Yellowstone County, Montana, 59101
Pictograph Cave is a 23-acre (93,000 m2) area of three caves (Pictograph, Middle, and Ghost caves) located 5 miles (8 km) south of Billings, Montana. Excavation of the three caves began in 1937.

Ponce-de-Leon-Inlet-Light

Ponce de Leon Inlet Light

Ponce Inlet, Volusia County, Florida, 32127
Originally called Mosquito Inlet Light, the lighthouse at Ponce de Leon Inlet, at 175 feet in height, is the tallest lighthouse in Florida and the one of the tallest in the United States.

Portland-Observatory

Portland Observatory

Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, 04101
The Portland Observatory is a historic maritime signal tower. Built in 1807, it is the only known surviving tower of its type in the United States.

Providence-City-Hall

Providence City Hall

Providence, Rhode Island, 02903
Providence City Hall is the center of the municipal government in Providence, Rhode Island, and is located at the southwest end of Kennedy Plaza.

Pueblo-Grande-Ruin

Pueblo Grande Ruin

Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona
Pueblo Grande Ruin and Irrigation Sites are pre-Columbian archaeological sites and ruins, located in Phoenix, Arizona. They include a prehistoric platform mound and irrigation canals.

Reed-O.-Smoot-House

Reed O. Smoot House

Provo, Utah County, Utah
The Reed Smoot House, also known as Mrs. Harlow E. Smoot House, was the home of Reed Smoot from 1892 to his death in 1941, and is located in Provo, Utah.

Robert-Mills-House

Robert Mills House

Columbia, South Carolina, 29201
The Robert Mills House is located in a parklike 4-acre parcel that occupies an entire city block in central Columbia. It is a two-story masonry structure, built out of brick set on a high basement with arcaded walls.

Robert-S.-Abbott-House

Robert S. Abbott House

Chicago, Cook County, Illinois
From 1926 until his death in 1940, Robert S. Abbott, the most successful Black publisher of his era and founder of the Chicago Defender newspaper, lived in part of this large Queen Anne brick duplex.

Rosebud-Battlefield-State-Park

Rosebud Battlefield State Park

Half Moon Hill, Big Horn County, Montana
Rosebud Battlefield State Park is the site of the Battle of the Rosebud. The battle, known also as Crook's Fight on the Rosebud or Battle of Rosebud Creek, was fought on June 17, 1876.

Second-Bank-of-the-United-States

Second Bank of the United States

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19106
The Second Bank was incorporated in 1816. Designed by William Strickland, this building, built between 1819 and 1824, is one of the finest examples of Greek Revival architecture in the United States.

Ships-of-the-Sea-Maritime-Museum-(William-Scarbrough-House)

Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum (William Scarbrough House)

Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia, 31401
William Scarbrough House is a historic house in Savannah, Georgia. It is now home to the Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum, and it has largely been restored to an early 19th-century appearance.

Shreveport-Municipal-Memorial-Auditorium

Shreveport Municipal Memorial Auditorium

Shreveport, Caddo County, Louisiana, 71101
Shreveport Municipal Memorial Auditorium is an Art Deco building constructed between 1926 and 1929 during the administration of Mayor Lee Emmett Thomas as a memorial to the servicemen of World War I.

Shreveport-Waterworks-Pumping-Station

Shreveport Waterworks Pumping Station

Shreveport, Caddo County, Louisiana, 71101
The Shreveport Waterworks Pumping Station, also known as the McNeil Street Pump Station, is a historic water pumping station in Shreveport, Louisiana.

Sixteenth-Street-Baptist-Church

Sixteenth Street Baptist Church

Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 35203
Called the First Colored Baptist Church of Birmingham when it was founded in 1873, this was the first black church to organize in Birmingham. In September 1963, the church was the target of a racially-motivated bombing that killed four girls.

Sloss-Furnaces

Sloss Furnaces

Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 35222
Sloss Furnaces was operated as a pig iron-producing blast furnace from 1882 to 1971. After closing it became one of the first industrial sites in the U.S. to be preserved for public use. The site currently serves as an interpretive museum of industry.

Statue-of-Liberty

Statue of Liberty

Jersey City, New York County, New York
The sculptor was Frederic Auguste Bartholdi. Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, the designer of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France, designed the internal framework that supports the copper plates that make up the statue.

Taliesin-West

Taliesin West

Scottsdale, Maricopa County, Arizona, 85259
Taliesin West was architect Frank Lloyd Wright's winter home and school in the desert from 1937 until his death in 1959 at the age of 91. Today it is the headquarters of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Tate-House

Tate House

Portland, Cumberland County, Maine, 04102
The Tate House is a historic house museum near the Fore River in the Stroudwater neighborhood of Portland, Maine.

Tennessee-State-Capitol

Tennessee State Capitol

Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee, 37243
The cornerstone for the building was laid on July 4, 1845, and construction finished in 1859. The Capitol was designed by noted architect William Strickland, who is buried in the North Wing.

Terrace-Hill

Terrace Hill

Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, 50312
Built in the Second Empire style, Terrace Hill became a National Historic Landmark in 2003. It was built by Benjamin Franklin Allen, the first millionaire in Iowa, as a home for his family. Since 1976, it has been the official residence of the Governor of Iowa.

Texas-Governor's-Mansion

Texas Governor's Mansion

Austin, Travis County, Texas, 78701
The Texas Governor's Mansion, is a historic home for the Governor of Texas in downtown Austin, Texas. Designed by prominent architect Abner Cook, it was built in 1854 and has been the home of every governor since 1856.

Texas-State-Capitol

Texas State Capitol

Austin, Travis County, Texas, 78701
The Texas State Capitol, completed in 1888, contains the offices and chambers of the Texas Legislature and the Office of the Governor. The Texas State Capitol is 308 feet (94 m) tall, making it the sixth tallest state capitol in the country.

The-Alamo

The Alamo

San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas
The full name of the site was San Antonio de Valero Mission. It was build by the Spanish in the 1700's for the education and conversion of local Native Americans.

The-Arcade

The Arcade

Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, 44115
The Arcade in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, is a Victorian-era structure of two nine-story buildings, joined by a five-story arcade with a glass skylight spanning over 300 feet (91 m), along the four balconies.

The-Blaine-House

The Blaine House

Augusta, Kennebec County, Maine, 04330
The Blaine House was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1964, for its association with James G. Blaine, an influential political and diplomatic figure on the national state in the decades following the American Civil War.

The-Breakers

The Breakers

Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island, 02840
Designed by Richard Morris Hunt for Cornelius Vanderbelt II, The Breakers is an Italian Renaissance mansion that would cost over 150 million dollars if it were built today. The four story building has 70 rooms built around a central Great Hall.

The-Henry-Ford

The Henry Ford

Dearborn, Wayne County, Michigan, 48124
The Henry Ford (also known as the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village, and more formally as the Edison Institute) is a large indoor and outdoor history museum complex, named for its founder, the noted automobile industrialist Henry Ford.

The-Thoroughgood-House

The Thoroughgood House

Virginia Beach, Virginia, 23455
The Thoroughgood House is a brick house located in the neighborhood of Thoroughgood in Virginia Beach, Virginia. It was built ca. 1719.

Tippecanoe-Battlefield-Park

Tippecanoe Battlefield Park

Battle Ground, Tippecanoe County, Indiana, 47920
Tippecanoe Battlefield Park was designated a National Historical Landmark in 1960. The park was the location of a battle between U.S. forces and Native Americans, who were opposed to U.S. expansion into their territory.

U.S.-Snagboat-Montgomery

U.S. Snagboat Montgomery

Carrollton, Pickens County, Alabama, 35447
Montgomery is one of the few surviving steam-powered sternwheelers in the United States and is one of only two surviving United States Army Corps of Engineers snagboats. It was built in 1925.

Union-Station-and-Trainshed

Union Station and Trainshed

Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama, 36104
Montgomery Union Station and its trainshed were built by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad and opened in 1898. In 1979, Union Station was closed, and after a period of disuse, Union Station was renovated for commercial tenants.

USS-KIDD-Veterans-Museum

USS KIDD Veterans Museum

Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge County, Louisiana
USS Kidd (DD-661), a Fletcher-class destroyer, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named after Rear Admiral Isaac C. Kidd, who died on the bridge of his flagship USS Arizona during the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

USS-Slater

USS Slater

Albany, New York, 12201
USS Slater is now a museum ship on the Hudson River in Albany, New York, the only one of its kind afloat in the United States.

Valley-Forge-National-Historical-Park

Valley Forge National Historical Park

Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
Famous as the camp for the Continental Army during the winter of 1777 - 1778, the park contains Washington's Headquarters, several monuments, reconstructed campsites and a visitor center.

Vermont-State-House

Vermont State House

Montpelier, Washington County, Vermont, 05633
The Vermont State House is the capitol and seat of Vermont General Assembly. The current Greek Revival structure is the third building on the same site to serve as the State House. It was designed in 1857 and opened in 1859.

Victoria-Mansion-(Morse-Libby-House)

Victoria Mansion (Morse-Libby House)

Portland, Maine, 04101
Victoria Mansion, also known as the Morse-Libby House or Morse-Libby Mansion, is a landmark example of American residential architecture located in downtown Portland, Maine.

Villa-Louis

Villa Louis

Prairie du Chien, Crawford County, Wisconsin, 53821
The Villa Louis, also known as Dousman Mansion, is a National Historic Landmark located on St. Feriole Island, in Prairie du Chien, southwestern Wisconsin.

Virginia-State-Capitol

Virginia State Capitol

Richmond, Virginia, 23218
The Virginia State Capitol, built between 1785 and 1788, is the seat of state government of the Commonwealth of Virginia, located in Richmond, the third capital city of the U.S. state of Virginia. The first two were Jamestown and Williamsburg.

Wainwright-Building

Wainwright Building

St. Louis, Missouri, 63101
In 1968, the Wainwright Building was designated as a National Historic Landmark. After a period of neglect, the building now houses Missouri state offices.

Waynesborough

Waynesborough

Paoli, Chester County, Pennsylvania, 19301
The beautiful Georgian-style house was built in three sections of native stone quarried on the property. Today, the house is restored and furnished to reflect the Wayne Family's life there through the Federal, Victorian and Colonial Revival periods.

Westminster-Arcade

Westminster Arcade

Providence, Rhode Island
The Westminster Arcade is a historic shopping center at 130 Westminster Street and 65 Weybosset Street in downtown Providence, Rhode Island. Built in 1828, it is notable as the first enclosed shopping mall in the United States.

William-Gilmore-Simms-Estate-(Woodlands)

William Gilmore Simms Estate (Woodlands)

Bamberg County, South Carolina
William Gilmore Simms Estate is nationally notable as the home for many years of author William Gilmore Simms (1806-1870), considered one of the leading literary voices of the antebellum Southern United State.

Wisconsin-State-Capitol

Wisconsin State Capitol

Madison, Dane County, Wisconsin, 53703
Completed in 1917, the building is the fifth to serve as the Wisconsin capitol since the first territorial legislature convened in 1836. The Wisconsin State Capitol is the tallest building in Madison.

Woolworth-Building

Woolworth Building

New York, New York, 10007
The Woolworth Building, at fifty-seven stories, is one of the oldest skyscrapers in New York City. It is still one of the fifty tallest buildings in the United States as well as one of the twenty tallest buildings in New York City.

Wyoming-State-Capitol

Wyoming State Capitol

Cheyenne, Laramie County, Wyoming, 82002
The Wyoming State Capitol was designated a U.S. National Historic Landmark in 1987.

Top 10 Most Popular National Historic Landmarks Landmarks

  1. Old North Church
  2. Abraham Lincoln Tomb
  3. The Alamo
  4. Abo Pueblo Ruins
  5. 'Iolani Palace
  6. Hoover Dam (Boulder Dam)
  7. Bear River Massacre Monument
  8. Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site
  9. Louisiana State Capitol
  10. French Quarter

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